Original Research

Santé et valorisation des plantes médicinales en Cóte d’Ivoire

L. Ake Assi
Bothalia | Vol 14, No 3/4 | a1215 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/abc.v14i3/4.1215 | © 1983 L. Ake Assi | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 03 November 1983 | Published: 06 November 1983

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Abstract

HEALTH AND THE EVALUATION OF MEDICINAL PLANTS IN THE IVORY COAST

The Ivory Coast, like most tropical countries, has a rich flora with many species, some of which contain active principles used in the preparation of useful remedies for the treatment of disease.

The art of curing disease is practisea in a very empirical way by healers all over the Ivory Coast.

In intertropical Africa, generally speaking, traditional medicine accounts for about 80-90c/t of the medicinal needs of the population. It has the advantage of being near at hand and provides medical treatment at low cost.

The study of medicinal plants will result in the production locally of medicines from indigenous raw materials, and the project, in addition to the exploitation of national resources, will create work opportunities.

Concerning ethnobotany, investigations carried out among healers in some areas of the Ivory Coast, have enabled the registration of several medicinal recipes that have resulted in various reports and publications.

Yet, slow progress with the registration of plants of use in human health restricts the possibilities of phytotherapy. Clearly, many plants remain to be studied and evaluated.

Unfortunately, thoughtless and rapid destruction of natural areas in several parts of the country, makes the discovery and judicious exploitation of our plant resources increasingly difficult.

Therefore, it is necessary to urge African governments to take draconian actions in order to save our endangered medical heritage.


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