Original Research

Phytogeography of the tropical north-east African mountains

I. Friis
Bothalia | Vol 14, No 3/4 | a1203 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/abc.v14i3/4.1203 | © 1983 I. Friis | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 03 November 1983 | Published: 06 November 1983

About the author(s)

I. Friis, Institute of Systematic Botany, University of Copenhagen, Sweden

Full Text:

PDF (2MB)

Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

The tropical north-east African mountains are tentatively divided into four phytochoria, the formal rank of which is not defined. The division is based on patterns of distribution and endemism in the region.

The recognition of a distinct Afromontane phytochorion is now well established (Chapman & White, 1970; Werger, 1978; White, 1978). However, there is still very little information on the phytogeography of the individual mountains or mountain systems. This study hopes to fill a little of the gap by analysing distribution patterns and patterns of endemism in the flora of the tropical north-east African mountains.

The north-east African mountain system is the largest in tropical Africa (see e.g. map in White, 1978). At the core of this system is the large Ethiopian massif, around which are located various mountains and mountain chains. These include the Red Sea Hills in the Sudan, the mountain chain in northern Somalia, the south-west Arabian mountains, and the Imatong mountains of south-east Sudan. The latter are often referred to the East African mountain system (White, 1978) but. as I will point out later, they also have a close connection with the south-west highlands of Ethiopia.

The paper presents some results of my study of the mountain flora of tropical north-east Africa, particularly the forest species. Where no source is indicated, the data are from my own unpublished studies.


Keywords

No related keywords in the metadata.

Metrics

Total abstract views: 1371
Total article views: 1877


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.