Search this journal:     Advanced search
Original Research

Managing conflict-generating invasive species in South Africa: Challenges and trade-offs

Tsungai Zengeya, Philip Ivey, Darragh J. Woodford, Olaf Weyl, Ana Novoa, Ross Shackleton, David Richardson, Brian van Wilgen

Bothalia; Vol 47, No 2 (2017), 11 pages. doi: 10.4102/abc.v47i2.2160

Submitted: 26 August 2016
Published:  31 March 2017

Abstract

Background: This paper reviewed the benefits and negative impacts of alien species that are currently listed in the Alien and Invasive Species Regulations of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act (Act no 10 of 2004) and certain alien species that are not yet listed in the regulations for which conflicts of interest complicate management.
Objectives: Specifically, it identified conflict-generating species, evaluated the causes and driving forces of these conflicts and assessed how the conflicts have affected management.
Method: A simple scoring system was used to classify the alien species according to their relative degree of benefits and negative impacts. Conflict-generating species were then identified and further evaluated using an integrated cognitive hierarchy theory and risk perception framework to identify the value systems (intrinsic and economic) and risk perceptions associated with each conflict.
Results: A total of 552 alien species were assessed. Most of the species were classified as inconsequential (55%) or destructive (29%). Beneficial (10%) and conflict-generating (6%) species made a minor contribution. The majority (46%) of the conflict cases were associated with more than one value system or both values and risk perception. The other conflicts cases were based on intrinsic (40%) and utilitarian (14%) value systems.
Conclusions: Conflicts based on value and risk perceptions are inherently difficult to resolve because authorities need to balance the needs of different stakeholders while meeting the mandate of conserving the environment, ecosystem services and human well-being. This paper uses the identified conflict-generating species to highlight the challenges and trade-offs of managing invasive species in South Africa.

Full Text:  |  HTML  |  EPUB  |  XML  |  Online Appendix  |  PDF (3MB)

Author affiliations

Tsungai Zengeya, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Kirstenbosch Research Centre, South Africa
Philip Ivey, Invasive Species Programme, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Kirstenbosch Research Centre, South Africa
Darragh J. Woodford, Centre for Invasion Biology, Animal, Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand; Centre for Invasion Biology, South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity (SAIAB), South Africa
Olaf Weyl, Centre for Invasion Biology, South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity (SAIAB), South Africa
Ana Novoa, Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa
Ross Shackleton, Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa
David Richardson, Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa
Brian van Wilgen, Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa

Keywords

Invasive species; conflicts; management; South Africa

Metrics

Total abstract views: 503
Total article views: 1010  

Cited-By

1. A proposed national strategic framework for the management of Cactaceae in South Africa
Haylee Kaplan, John R.U. Wilson, Hildegard Klein, Lesley Henderson, Helmuth G. Zimmermann, Phetole Manyama, Philip Ivey, David M. Richardson, Ana Novoa
Bothalia  vol: 47  issue: 2  year: 2017  
doi: 10.4102/abc.v47i2.2149

Comments on this article

Before posting your comment, please read our policy.
Post a Comment (Login required)


ISSN: 0006-8241 (print) | ISSN: 2311-9284 (online)

Connect on: Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn and YouTube

Subscribe to our newsletter

All articles published in this journal are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license, unless otherwise stated.

Website design & content: ©2017 AOSIS (Pty) Ltd. All rights reserved. No unauthorised duplication allowed.

AOSIS Publishing | Empowering Africa through access to knowledge
Postnet Suite #110, Private Bag X19, Durbanville, South Africa, 7551
Tel: 086 1000 381
Tel: +27 21 975 2602
Fax: 086 5004 974

publishing(AT)aosis.co.za replace (AT) with @

Please read the privacy statement.